Read The Crime of All Crimes: Toward a Criminology of Genocide by Nicole Rafter Online

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Cambodia. Rwanda. Armenia. Nazi Germany. History remembers these places as the sites of unspeakable crimes against humanity, and indisputably, of genocide. Yet, throughout the twentieth century, the world has seen many instances of violence committed by states against certain groups within their borders—from the colonial ethnic cleansing the Germans committed against the HCambodia. Rwanda. Armenia. Nazi Germany. History remembers these places as the sites of unspeakable crimes against humanity, and indisputably, of genocide. Yet, throughout the twentieth century, the world has seen many instances of violence committed by states against certain groups within their borders—from the colonial ethnic cleansing the Germans committed against the Herero tribe in Africa, to the Katyn Forest Massacre, in which the Soviets shot over 20,000 Poles, to anti-communist mass murders in 1960s Indonesia. Are mass crimes against humanity like these still genocide? And how can an understanding of crime and criminals shed new light on how genocide—the “crime of all crimes”—transpires?In The Crime of All Crimes, criminologist Nicole Rafter takes an innovative approach to the study of genocide by comparing eight diverse genocides--large-scale and small; well-known and obscure—through the lens of criminal behavior. Rafter explores different models of genocidal activity, reflecting on the popular use of the Holocaust as a model for genocide and ways in which other genocides conform to different patterns. For instance, Rafter questions the assumption that only ethnic groups are targeted for genocidal “cleansing," and she also urges that actions such as genocidal rape be considered alongside traditional instances of genocidal violence. Further, by examining the causes of genocide on different levels, Rafter is able to construct profiles of typical victims and perpetrators and discuss means of preventing genocide, in addition to delving into the social psychology of genocidal behavior and the ways in which genocides are brought to an end. A sweeping and innovative investigation into the most tragic of events in the modern world, The Crime of All Crimes will fundamentally change how we think about genocide in the present day....

Title : The Crime of All Crimes: Toward a Criminology of Genocide
Author :
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ISBN : 9781479859481
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Crime of All Crimes: Toward a Criminology of Genocide Reviews

  • *Avonna
    2018-09-26 05:26

    The Crime of All Crimes: Toward a Criminology of Genocide by Nicole Rafter is an intriguing study published by the NYU Press. Eight twentieth century genocides are systematically studied with comparative criminology. Ms. Rafter looks at the micro and macro causes of these genocides and brings in many other scholarly papers and experiments to back up her examples and conclusions.Although the subject is difficult, this book is well written and interesting. It is easy to read and understand, even for the amateur student of criminology, psychology or political science. I would hope that many people will read this book and not just college students. If more people and countries have this type of information, I hope we can identify genocides before they occur and/or stop them from happening altogether.Thank you to the NYU Press and Net Galley for allowing me to read this book for free in exchange for an honest review.

  • ❀Aimee❀ Just one more page...
    2018-10-19 02:27

    DNF at 19%.This is likely to appeal more to criminologists, sociologists, psychologists, and anthropologists than the average reader . I'm no stranger to research papers or journals, but I read ones geared more toward medicine. This book reads a lot like a long research article/paper proving a theory. I was looking for something with a more inclusive target audience. I was hoping for something a little less clinical and more human experience. The book was readable, but it felt very detached from the emotion of the topic. There's nothing wrong with that, it just wasn't what I was looking for.Thank you NYU Press and Netgalley for a free digital copy in exchange for an honest review.

  • Austin Bowman
    2018-10-19 07:24

    I received an advanced copy of "The Crime of All Crimes" from NetGalley, and was impressed by both the depth of research as well as the analysis provided. Focusing on eight different genocides around the world, Dr. Rafter analyzes the risk factors, causes, and aftermath of genocides. She brings together the insights of other fields (e.g., psychology, anthropology, sociology, etc.), as well as her own background in criminology, to arrive at a much more detailed analysis than I have ever seen before in a book on this subject. Furthermore, it was incredibly interesting to read as she expanded on the Macro, Meso, and Micro causes of genocide. Overall, though the subject matter is incredibly intense, Dr. Rafter makes it enlightening and accessible. I would recommend it to students of not only political science and history, but also subjects such as psychology and economics because as Dr. Rafter has shown, great insights can come from bringing different perspectives together.

  • Jill
    2018-10-05 07:30

    I want to say first and foremost I am deeply saddened to hear about the very recent death of Nicole Rafter, on February 29, 2016. It saddens me that such a talented author and scholar particularly in the field of criminology will not be able to see the release of her newest book, "The Crime of All Crimes" released today March 29, 2016. To purchase a copy of this book hot off the press CLICK HERE.I chose this book to read mainly because of the subject, genocide has been on my mind recently. I have always been interested by the Holocaust not only interested but it was something that shook my inner core. I have read quite a few books on it. I also have read quite a few books on the Rwandan genocide in the 1990's. I am always heartbroken and confused on why genocides continue to happen and why we allow them to happen? Because for most of us, we usually take a back seat and watch it happen from the safety of our homes. Or we live our lives in ignorance and denial, living without knowing that these atrocities are happening to our neighbors. I had the same questions as the author did. How can people do this? Overall, I would rate this book 3.5 stars out of 5. It was an extremely in depth, detailed investigation on the criminology of eight genocides. It compared and contrasted these genocides in attempt to answer questions such as: how do genocides happen? This book was extremely interesting and informative. It was presented in well organized scientific profiles of eight genocides. This book did a very good job at presenting the information at hand, including backing everything up with facts and statistics.Being very well organized usually is a good thing, but sometimes such as in this book it didn't work out so well. I found it too organized, too repetitive. Because of the repetitiveness of the book there was some unnecessary information, and the book could have been shortened in length. The repetitiveness I felt took away from the integrity of the book. It was still a good read, I do not regret reading it because this book definitely has value. This book would be good for people who have an interest in genocides and would like to learn more. People who have an interest in criminology, sociology, and psychology would like this book as well. This book discusses an important topic that does need to be read and discussed.I would like to thank Netgalley, Nicole Hahn Rafter (the author), and NYU Press (the publisher) for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review. Come and read my blog at http://turnthepagereviewsbyjill.blogs...

  • Andrew
    2018-10-09 04:49

    This was a difficult read for me. Not in a bad way but in a very good way. It's a very deep look into genocide. There is a UN definition of genocide that is expanded, and rightfully so in my opinion, by the author. She than takes 8 genocides over the past 100 years and looks for similarities. In so doing she employs criminology to understand these similarities. Part of why it was hard was my constant need to look at the references. being a kindle read I would have to guess where the reference might be and scroll forward or backwards to find the spot. Had this been a physical book it would have been much easier. That's quibbling on small things. The information and the conclusions are heady stuff. Perpetrators are rarely held accountable and the group being slaughtered are generally not at war with the perpetrators to name 2 conclusions. I truly appreciate the authors not focusing on the Jewish end of the holacaust but on one of the many others groups who also suffered, the disabled. There were many other groups who also suffered but are not generally remembered. It puts the Nazi killing machine on a whole new level. She also picks genocides that are more current but that we tend to forget. Cambodia, Guatamala, Indonesia. Failing governments that try to remain in power or new governments trying to establish power. The overall takeaway is both depressing and enlightening.Reads very much like the scientific journal it is. So the casual reader, who probably wouldn't want to read anyway, beware. If you are trying to understand man's inhumanity this book will both answer questions while posing new ones. A book that should be a primer for those entering politics.I was given this book by Net Galley in exchange for and honest review.

  • Peter
    2018-09-25 05:34

    Well written and researched. Professor Rafter's book is highly accessible and scholarly, allowing it to be used as a primer for an undergraduate class as well as a text that the layperson may enjoy. I enjoyed her inclusion of historical definitions. A must for political science students.