Read How to Babysit an Orangutan by Tara Darling Kathy Darling Online

how-to-babysit-an-orangutan

"Children will enjoy the array of colorful, candid full-color photos of babies grooming, playing, feeding and mugging it up". -- KR....

Title : How to Babysit an Orangutan
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780802784667
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 33 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

How to Babysit an Orangutan Reviews

  • Ann
    2018-12-06 12:01

    I really enjoyed the latter half of this book where the author finally got into the actual raising of baby orphaned orangutans. I love animals and thought it was quite interesting to see some of the babysitting processes, what goes into raising orangutans to be able to be released into the wild, and the various personalities of the orangutans. So cute!!!The photographs, while nothing incredible, are cute, too, and help to tell the story.I had to dock at least one star, though, for the the first 8 pages or so, where the author is introducing why the babies are orphaned, etc. I think the information could have been conveyed in a way that was less dramatic, since - after all - this book is geared for children who I doubt have had anything to do with the decline of the orangutans.I think the terms "greedy animals dealers" was misplaced. Of course I don't support such trades at all, but sometimes when stuff like this happens it's not at black and white as it seems - perhaps they are trying to feed their family. Perhaps not - but I would have liked more explanation. Ditto on the "For every baby that reaches a circus, private zoo, or movie trainer, eight orangutans don't survive the trip." Again, I would have liked this statement explained - do ALL private zoos acquire their apes this way? Are some upstanding? What about movie trainers? For example, apparently farmers in Africa were hunting cheetah's because they thought they were killing their livestock. So, to try and protect the livestock (and thus the livelihood of the farmers and their families) but also protect the cheetahs, Anatolian Shepard dogs were given to the farmers to scare off the cheetahs. Everyone wins!! :) Again, I think it was more the approach that "turned me off" than the data. Especially since it might upset sensitive young readers, and I would have liked it better had it conveyed the messages in a more approachable way. The book does have a lot to offer - so if you read it for that than it's quite cute and interesting :)

  • Kathryn
    2018-11-19 19:50

    Okay, I know I want to babysit a baby orangutan after reading this book. I don't think I have the energy or patience to be in it for the long-haul as author Tar Darling is (yay for her!) but I do think orangutans are fascinating creatures and it was very interesting to learn about life at this sanctuary and orphanage where young orangs are raised until they can go off on their own (and, sometimes, they come back as adults to visit their former "parents"/"babysitters"). This book has a lot going for it, from the cute photos to the thoughtful information about a day in the life of a young orang. The message of trying to help these babies is a good one, though delivered in a bit of a heavy-handed and possibly disturbing way at times (sensitive readers might be very upset to learn some of the stark and sobering facts about orangutans killed and sold from the wild). A few aspects are a bit too loaded and black-and-white for my taste, i.e., the term "greedy animal hunters" (after all, some people are not in it for the riches but rather to keep their own children fed). These cautions aside, though, I do think this will appeal to many readers. It was unfortunate that the library copy I had did not include the fly paper as supposedly there is information there on how children can "adopt" a baby orang. I think this is important because otherwise children could feel rather powerless about all the terrible things happening to orangutans.

  • Anna Chaddick
    2018-11-20 19:38

    Describes how baby orangutans whose mothers have died are nurtured by human babysitters at Camp Leakey in the rain forests of Borneo, until they are ready to live in the wild. I love animals and thought it was quite interesting to see some of the babysitting processes, what goes into raising orangutans to be able to be released into the wild, and the various personalities of the orangutans. I didn't care for the the first 8 pages or so, where the author is introducing why the babies are orphaned, etc. I think the information could have been conveyed in a way that was less dramatic, since - after all - this book is geared for children who I doubt have had anything to do with the decline of the orangutans. I don't really know how I could incorporate this book in my classroom. It could be in a section with other animal books and could maybe teach children about the personalities of different animals.

  • Eric Mcweeny
    2018-11-29 11:42

    How to Babysit an Orangutan by Tara Darling caught my attention immediately because of my love for primates. Monkeys, Gorillas, and Orangutans have always been some of my favorite animals. This story informs the audience of a lot of unknown facts about the introduction of Orangutans back into the wild. Orphan Orangutans are raised at camps together before being released into their native homelands. These "babysitters" are not always rewarded by the orangutans for their kindness, sometimes they are bit and inflicted with other minor damages by the adapting orangutans. Kids with interests in animals will benefit from the information in this story.

  • Andrea
    2018-11-16 17:00

    its a good book