Read Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond by Renya K. Ramirez Online

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Most Native Americans in the United States live in cities, where many find themselves caught in a bind, neither afforded the full rights granted U.S. citizens nor allowed full access to the tribal programs and resources—particularly health care services—provided to Native Americans living on reservations. A scholar and a member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, Renya K.Most Native Americans in the United States live in cities, where many find themselves caught in a bind, neither afforded the full rights granted U.S. citizens nor allowed full access to the tribal programs and resources—particularly health care services—provided to Native Americans living on reservations. A scholar and a member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, Renya K. Ramirez investigates how urban Native Americans negotiate what she argues is, in effect, a transnational existence. Through an ethnographic account of the Native American community in California’s Silicon Valley and beyond, Ramirez explores the ways that urban Indians have pressed their tribes, local institutions, and the federal government to expand conventional notions of citizenship.Ramirez’s ethnography revolves around the Paiute American activist Laverne Roberts’s notion of the “hub,” a space that allows for the creation of a sense of belonging away from a geographic center. Ramirez describes “hub-making” activities in Silicon Valley, including sweat lodge ceremonies, powwows, and American Indian Alliance meetings, gatherings at which urban Indians reinforce bonds of social belonging and forge intertribal alliances. She examines the struggle of the Muwekma Ohlone, a tribe aboriginal to the San Francisco Bay area, to maintain a sense of community without a land base and to be recognized as a tribe by the federal government. She considers the crucial role of Native women within urban indigenous communities; a 2004 meeting in which Native Americans from Mexico and the United States discussed cross-border indigenous rights activism; and the ways that young Native Americans in Silicon Valley experience race and ethnicity, especially in relation to the area’s large Chicano community. A unique and important exploration of diaspora, transnationalism, identity, belonging, and community, Native Hubs is intended for scholars and activists alike....

Title : Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780822340300
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Native Hubs: Culture, Community, and Belonging in Silicon Valley and Beyond Reviews

  • Allicia
    2018-12-18 00:15

    I completely agree on the Native Diaspora concept and the transnationalism felt by natives. I also liked many of the insights that the interviewees stated. My favorite chapters were the last two, but the overall book is excellent and I would recommend many people to read this. Thanks Lloyd for lending it to me.

  • molly
    2018-12-15 18:12

    Renya Ramirez is a professor at UC Santa Cruz, and was rushed to publish this book to get tenure, and is a theoretical intervention as well as an on-the-ground intervention. I think she does a really amazing job explaining incredible complex theories and ideas in ways that are very forth-coming and easy to understand. In this book, she focuses on Native American community healing from colonialism & community decolonization in the Silicon Valley, in hopes to create a community about supporting and creating alliances to make real social change. Throughout this book she raises invaluable questions that interrogate the relationship you have to the people you are writing/researching about.

  • Deborah
    2018-12-02 18:58

    Written by a ucsc grad student and native woman, a must-read for folks trying to describe or find or celebrate how california Indians have survived as cultural groups after both Missionization and the Gold Rush. A good discussion of how culture evolves to meet change, losing none of the "indianness" of that culture along the way. And a fun writing style, too. Interviews with local non-recognized tribes and their leaders (most prominantly, Rosemary Cambra and the Muwekma tribe), along with stories about battling for recognition, photographs and personal narrative give the text immediacy and liveliness.

  • Lloyd
    2018-11-25 18:51

    This is a well-written and enlightening book. It tells the stories of contemporary urban Native people working to create 'native hubs' to maintain their worldview and identity. It's great to read how contemporary Native people are doing that in the 21st century. I recommend it a great deal!