Read Liberator by Richard Harland Online

liberator

Die Dreckigen, die mit ihrer Arbeit die Dampfturbinen des britischen Juggernauts, des Weltschiffs Worldshaker, in Gang halten, haben in einer Revolution die Herrschaft der feinen Leute von den oberen Decks gestürzt und den Worldshaker in Liberator, also Befreier, umbenannt. Doch die alten Mächte haben noch nicht aufgegeben: Sabotageakte erschüttern das Schiff, und schnellDie Dreckigen, die mit ihrer Arbeit die Dampfturbinen des britischen Juggernauts, des Weltschiffs Worldshaker, in Gang halten, haben in einer Revolution die Herrschaft der feinen Leute von den oberen Decks gestürzt und den Worldshaker in Liberator, also Befreier, umbenannt. Doch die alten Mächte haben noch nicht aufgegeben: Sabotageakte erschüttern das Schiff, und schnell werden sie den Bewohnern der oberen Decks in die Schuhe geschoben, auch wenn sie, wie Col Porpentine, auf der Seite der Revolution gestanden haben. Riff, die Anführerin der Revolution, der Col zur Seite gestanden hat, fühlt sich nun gezwungen, ihren Freund zu ignorieren. Als die Juggernauts der anderen Nationen auftauchen, um dem revolutionären Spuk auf dem Liberator ein Ende zu bereiten, setzen sich die radikalsten Mitglieder des Revolutionskomittees durch, allen voran die wunderschöne unerbittliche Lye, die nun diktatorisch herrscht. Lye ist Cols erbittertste Feindin, und geschickt entfernt sie Riff aus ihrer Führungsrolle. Doch auch wenn die Vornehmen von ehedem wie in einem Lager zusammengepfercht sind und stündlich um ihr Leben fürchten müssen, riskiert Col sein Leben für die Verteidigung des Liberator – und für Riff....

Title : Liberator
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9783941787353
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 416 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Liberator Reviews

  • Ranting Dragon
    2018-10-18 09:48

    http://www.rantingdragon.com/liberato...(This review contains spoilers for Worldshaker by Richard Harland)Liberator is the excellent sequel to Richard Harland’s 2009 steampunk adventure, Worldshaker, and once again the majority of the story takes place on the huge mobile city, now renamed to reflect its liberated status. While you do have to have read Worldshaker to fully appreciate Liberator, I personally found the entertainment value alone of both books more than worth the few hours it took to read them.The story continuesLiberator picks up a few months after the events of Worldshaker. The Filthies may now have their freedom, but not all is well on the immense juggernaut. A saboteur and murderer is concealed within the population and suspicion falls upon the former upper decks residents, or Swanks. The resulting paranoia, paired with the lingering ill-feeling of the Filthies towards their former oppressors, widens the already substantial division between the two groups and offers the perfect climate for extremists to gain power. Furthermore, the Liberator faces not only war within the ranks of its citizens, but also assault from external sources as Imperialist juggernauts converge upon its position. Riff and Col must overcome their mistrust and unite the factions if anyone is to survive the oncoming storm.Bigger and bolderOverall, Liberator encompasses greater character development, greater scope and more intense action than its predecessor. We are offered more insight into the characters of the protagonists, Riff and Col, and watch them grow with the decisions they make throughout the story. Furthermore, Harland’s antagonists, such as Lye, are more developed than those in Worldshaker, with understandable flaws and motives rather than coming across as ‘just plain evil’ or serving solely as devices through which to parody certain historical stereotypes. The supporting cast, such as Col’s parents, teacher and even the ambiguous dog/cat Murgatrude, also benefit from some further attention. The result makes them much more real and endearing, while still remaining quirky and larger than life.Throughout the course of this novel we finally get a glimpse of what Harland’s world is like beyond the claustrophobic confines of the mobile city. We visit an Imperial colony, located in Botany Bay and powered by convict labour, that exists purely to refuel the roaming juggernauts, and we even get to see some of the other, deadlier, mobile fortresses firsthand. The world outside is alien and threatening to Filthies and Swanks alike, yet can no longer be ignored if they are to continue to survive. All in all, this enhanced worldbuilding adds to the authenticity of the novel, reinforcing the perception of the Liberator as both a world contained within itself and yet still a part of a greater whole.Life after revolutionHarland also does a good job of showing that life is not all joy and harmony in the aftermath of a revolution (complete with ample thinly veiled allusions to the Russian Revolution). Fanatics from both sides, Imperialist and Revolutionary, are depicted as inclined to bigotry and capable of using ruthless means to achieve their goals. Questions raised by the previous book, such as the inevitable reactions of the other Imperial juggernauts to the Filthy upheaval and the plight of their own analogous lower classes, are likewise explored.The novel also provides some exhilarating battle scenes, laugh out loud moments (I’m thinking of Col’s mother’s personal revelation) and food for thought, all set in the bizarre and strangely alluring environment of the industrial behemoth.Why should you read this book?Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed both Liberator and Worldshaker, and while their slightly unconventional style may not be to everyone’s taste, I found it a welcome break from the bleaker outlook and somewhat heavier tone prominent in many contemporary sci-fi and fantasy offerings. While the book is aimed at the young adult audience, I would also recommend it to older readers, such as myself, who are looking for a fun and quirky science fiction/fantasy read that has depth but doesn’t take itself too seriously.

  • Hexa Deville
    2018-09-27 03:00

    I love Riff. She is the best thing that has happened in this duology. Col, however, has been a complete useless and incompetent Swank who does nothing but drag Riff down. BUT, if he makes her happy, then at east he has SOME meaning in life, right?

  • Orkhan
    2018-10-17 10:50

    This book as a previous one is very good at connecting themes together. There was some questions from book one that were answered here. Some questions were not answered possibly because author couldn't keep up with them nevertheless it did answer a lot of them.

  • Roh
    2018-10-13 09:49

    I'm no writer. I admit this. I'm not even a literary student of any kind. But I am a consumer of stories. And in my opinion this book has some of the worst flaws a writer can put into a story. Once driven, intelligent, and perceptive people are suddenly wishy washy, blind, and stupid because the writer doesn't seem to want to put effort into reaching a plot they want. Its really disgusting.

  • Raye
    2018-09-28 09:47

    I thought the ending of the Worldshaker was it but it was good that it did and that Liberator was created. It starts off with the attack of a saboteur and the power control within the Filthies. I am not much of a fan of stories like this and I got bored at it and I feel like I was dragging myself again like in the first book about the happenings in this story, though there is one part of the story that got me interested. Right now, I just figured out that the entire story for me was like a roller coaster ride for children, its slow but their are parts of it that are exhilarating to experience. Sadly, I cannot imagine much of what was happening in the story especially on parts where automation is concerned. In the story, I was amused that the Upper Class people were given a name in the second installment: Swanks. I would also like to note about the attitude of Sephaltina and her spoiled bratiness, I kinda reminds me of well me. But I wouldn't go over drive like her, just sayin. Mr. Gibber was a really really really weird character but nonetheless prove his significance in the story. I thought Lye's cruelty was that she was jealous of Riff because Col is in love with Riff and not her. I was so wrong. But I was right in some accusations I had of her. The character that I really liked was Antrobus (In my ad I keep saying Astrobus XD) and how he really made an impact in the story by not saying a single word to uttering a complete and comprehensive sentence that even I was left to stutter. I would have like Septimus to express more of his love toward Gillabeth because I am a sucker for romance. Col and Riff's relationship was stronger than ever and I was happy that everything went well.Just a side remark:the names of the characters were very hard, specially the Swanks's, to remember and pronounce unlike the names of the Filthies.This may come as a shock (to me) because when the ending came, it was so heartfelt that made this book a three stars and not two.I would suggest this to people wanting action and not much the lovy dovy stuff.

  • Scout The Dog
    2018-09-29 02:49

    I really enjoyed Liberator, and World Shaker, too. I think these books deserve a higher fan base. In my opinion, they weren't as great as other steampunk books I've read, like the Leviathan and Airborn trilogies, but still...Worldshaker and Liberator were awesome. I wish I'd never read them, so I could experience reading them for the first time all over again!

  • Gabby
    2018-10-11 08:31

    This book was AAAAAAAAAAAMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG

  • Ian Wood
    2018-09-27 06:49

    This is the complete review as it appears on my blog. Note that links in blog reviews are not reproduced here and any updates or modifications which are made on the blog will not be replicated here.NOTE: SPOILERS!Liberator is the sequel to Worldshaker and it’s really the same title since the name of the ship in the first volume was Worldshaker, but it has now changed to Liberator. I love that for some reason! This novel is set three months after the initial story, and whereas the original novel ended on an upbeat and happy tune, this one hits the ground running on a really sour note. I was a bit disheartened to find that sour note pervades the whole story, especialyl since I really liked Worldshaker.The "Filthies" are now completely in charge of the Liberator, and they're spitting on the dreams of volume one, whereby everyone would live in harmony - even as they proclaim that as their goal. We’re now in a diametrically opposed position whereby it’s the Filthies who are dominant and antagonistic towards the "Swanks" - the upper deck clueless Victorians (note that this is Queen Victoria 2, and she's no longer queen, having been deposed, but she still lives aboard the ship as an ordinary citizen, along with her husband, Albert - and she's pregnant). But the real problem is sabotage; someone is quietly trying to wreck machinery on the ship, and this culminates as the story Liberator launches, with the death of one of the Filthies. It's a brutal death by means of a wrench applied repeatedly to a skull.This Filthy was a council member (the ruling body of the Filthies, no Swanks allowed), and his loss is great. Col's sister, Gillabeth volunteers to investigate the murder, but no one is interested in having a Swank involved. Council member Shiv volunteers, promoting his admiring friend Lye to his old position, and also onto the council, which means that Riff is no longer the dominant council member, and Shiv is very powerful. Shiv then loads scores of people onto his investigative team, which he renames 'security team', all of whom wear red armbands There are two things I derived from this.The first of these is that it’s Shiv himself who is the saboteur, and his sabotage is aimed at fomenting a surge of hatred towards the Swanks, and inciting a pogrom. Either that or it’s Lye all along, and she's using Shiv as a means to an end. The second thing this brought to mind is the French Revolution. I can see parallels between that, and how this take-over is sliding into place aboard Liberator. So here Harland has achieved the basis of a sequel - make it the same as the original but different! That is, it needs to be sufficiently like the original to maintain the audience you won from that, but it has to be different (or warped, or twisted, however you want to view it) enough that it presents a new story. So Harland began cultivating this, perhaps, in the best way (having the positions reversed from the first novel vis-à-vis the Swanks vs. the Filthies, but from that point on, he really just let it go to seed.Aside from pure speculation, there are also several facts which we must hold in mind about this situation aboard the Liberator. An important one of these is that Lye, for reasons unknown, thoroughly hates Col, and now she is in a position of power. A second fact is that Col's status has diminished to nothing, despite the fact that he quite literally saved Riff's life and thereby enabled her to save the ship. Without his help, the revolution was going nowhere, yet he's given no credit for this whatsoever. A third, and very disturbing fact is that Riff herself is not giving Col a fair shake. She treats him like a problem rather than a partner, and this is what frankly incensed me the most!What happened to Riff's independence, courage, and feistiness from the first novel? Here she's muted and constrained. She will not stand by Col, yet she asks that he trust her. How he can put up with her demonstrated lack of regard for him is as much a mystery as it is an annoyance. Col never was very good at being assertive, and that hasn’t improved.Since Liberator is running low on fuel, the ship has to dock at Botany Bay in Australia to re-coal. The only thing they have to trade is valuable artifacts, ornaments and furniture from the empty rooms of those Swanks who disembarked Liberator immediately after the revolution. And they need Victoria and Albert's support to engage with the coal supplier because they apparently would not do business with the Filthies. This does lend the Swanks a certain amount of power.One more disturbing development: the Filthies consider the library books to be artifacts and three of them, including Riff's brother, Padder, come to the library to take the books. Col and Septimus, his lower-ranking friend from book one, fend them off, but it’s clear that Padder hates Col as much as Lye does (for reasons inexplicable in this case), and the former warns the latter off of involvement with his sister. They way Col is treated it seems he would be better off jumping ship! But given the huge mess Harland has presented us with here, I must admit I am very curious about how he intends to clean it up - assuming he can and does!But to pursue this jumping ship motif: one thing which made no sense to me at all is why any of these people, Swanks or Filthies, would even want to remain on Liberator. What do they have to gain? Harland does not even attempt to answer this, he just takes it as a given. And given how disgusted Col was with the damage which Liberator does to the environment as it tears up the land beneath it, this problem is let go as well - it's just never addressed. The answer to my question above is that the occupants of liberator have absolutely nothing to gain by staying on board and continuing to run and maintain it. Why did they not simply park it somewhere where food supplies were bountiful, disable it, and start living off the land and sea?As long as I'm complaining(!),I have to say that the publishers really screwed-up with Patrick Reilly's end paper illustrations. These were drawn for the first book, Worldshaker (and even at that had the number of decks wrong!), but at the end of that novel, a host of Swanks left the ship, yet we're still expected to believe, according to the unadjusted illustration, that there is over ten thousand swanks and over 2,000 Filthies. Clearly, someone didn’t think, and I have to hold Harland, as the author, responsible for not setting them straight on the changes that needed to be made.I also have to add that by about 160 pages in, I stopped really liking this story. At that point I was merely tolerating it to see if I could manage to stay on board long enough to find out where Harland was sailing with this, and the answer to that question I can now reveal is: the middle of nowhere! I honestly don't know what he thought he was doing, but Col was already quite enough of a limp rag in volume one. Harland has turned him into a big fat nothing in volume two. Why Col even stays on board is a really good question since Riff treats him like dirt! She has almost no respect for him and even less love, yet Col puts up with it all. I can't believe it's love. Infatuation maybe, but not love. Love hasn't had a chance to sprout, let alone blossom.They screw-up badly at Botany Bay and end up in a battle with the local soldiers. The saboteur left a note pinned on a door announcing the raid, and the Filthies were in serious trouble. They win, but only because Col lets out the convicts from the prison there, who then run riot. The next thing Col knows, the convicts are in Shiv's security squad and they're carrying rifles. The security people are systematically victimizing the Swanks, and no one seems even remotely bothered by this. The revolution has come full circle, with the Filthies treating the swanks exactly like the Swanks had treated the Filthies, and because of the hand-written note which warned the Botany Bay people of the Filthies' attack, they now have even more reason to think that the saboteur is a Swank, since none of the Filthies can write (so we’re told!). At this point I'd also been forced to the conclusion that it’s Lye who's behind all of this sabotage, etc, and her motive is pure malice towards the Swanks, since she feels they have been so brutal towards her.What the Swanks should do now is disembark right there at Botany Bay and leave the Filthies to it, yet not a one of them even thinks about this let alone suggests it as a possibility. This really tested my suspension of disbelief to breaking point. Meanwhile, the Liberator's telegraph office has been sabotaged, and the other ships: the equivalents of Liberator captained by other nations - are vectoring in on Botany Bay, alerted to the mutiny, and dedicated to taking back the Liberator. The Russians have the Romanov, The Turks have the Battle of Something-Or-Other. I forget! Sorry! The French have the Marseilleuse. Why the other nations would support the re-taking of the Liberator, given the evident rivalry between them, is yet another unsolved mystery on this voyage. The other ships are all better-armed than is Liberator. Col passes on this information to Riff, but Lye talks over him and Col eventually gives up and leaves - that is, leaves their company, not the ship.The professor and Septimus have discovered (from reading various books in their precious library), what exactly was done to the Menials, but they're prevented from properly examining those people to see if they could perhaps help, by the callous bullying of the security forces. This means that Riff's parents could be freed, and I guessed that this would be what really gets Col and Riff back together, but at this point, I was hardly even rooting for Col, much less Riff. She's turned out to be a complete jerk, so Harland killed my interest in this romance.I liked Riff in the first novel. I tolerated Col. I found the latter hardly more tolerable in this second volume, and I found Riff to be completely obnoxious. She treated Col quite literally like dirt and at one point "viciously" slapped him across the face; then suddenly the two of them are professing their love for each other and when Col says he loves her but he's still married to Sephaltina, Riff suddenly gives him the cold shoulder? No. I'm sorry but no sale. My spell-checker wants to change Sephaltina to 'Asphalting'! LOL! Let this be a lesson to us writers to make sure our characters names don't sound like crap to a spell-checker!Back on track here! This entire 'romance' lacked credibility in Liberator. It was a joke, and on that note, here's a choice quote from p187: "Now he was thinking about Riff and himself…. Would it ever come good between them? How could it ever come good? It seemed like the ultimate cruelty that finally he knew he loved her, finally he knew she loved him, and still they couldn’t come together." I'll leave that for you to make of it what you will, but I very nearly laughed out loud at Harland's unintentional (I assume it was unintentional!) double-entendre!On a much more serious note, the quote above was Col's own thoughts. This was a boy who had been raised in the highest echelons of Victorian society, and he's using a phrase like "come good"? Someone from the backwoods of North America might credibly employ a phrase like that, but no one in Victorian England of his breeding would ever use a phrase like that, much less think it. Again with the suspension of disbelief!I've wavered back and forth between really disliking this novel, and finding it just about readable, and it's because of that, that I'm going to rate it as a 'warty'. It just did not do enough to win me back over from the dark side. At one point I almost dropped the thing and abandoned it altogether (that was right after the Riff-slaps-Col imbroglio). The story-telling was a bit too fond of deus ex machina for my taste, but the worst problem was that I found it ever harder to buy this love between Riff and Col the more I read, particularly given that her behavior towards him throughout the first half of the novel was totally unacceptable and betrayed any pretense of love. I kept on reading solely because I was curious to learn if Harland could dig himself out of this hole and he really couldn’t, although he did try, but I don’t award points for trying - not in this game! Write or write not. There is no try.

  • Michelle
    2018-10-10 07:38

    Also published under The Ranting Dragon: http://www.rantingdragon.com/liberato...Interview with author: http://www.rantingdragon.com/intervie...Liberator is the excellent sequel to Richard Harland’s 2009 steampunk adventure, Worldshaker, and once again the majority of the story takes place on the huge mobile city, now renamed to reflect its liberated status. While you do have to have read Worldshaker to fully appreciate Liberator, I personally found the entertainment value alone of both books more than worth the few hours it took to read them.The story continuesLiberator picks up a few months after the events of Worldshaker. The Filthies may now have their freedom, but not all is well on the immense juggernaut. A saboteur and murderer is concealed within the population and suspicion falls upon the former upper decks residents, or Swanks. The resulting paranoia, paired with the lingering ill-feeling of the Filthies towards their former oppressors, widens the already substantial division between the two groups and offers the perfect climate for extremists to gain power. Furthermore, the Liberator faces not only war within the ranks of its citizens, but also assault from external sources as Imperialist juggernauts converge upon its position. Riff and Col must overcome their mistrust and unite the factions if anyone is to survive the oncoming storm.Bigger and bolderOverall, Liberator encompasses greater character development, greater scope and more intense action than its predecessor. We are offered more insight into the characters of the protagonists, Riff and Col, and watch them grow with the decisions they make throughout the story. Furthermore, Harland’s antagonists, such as Lye, are more developed than those in Worldshaker, with understandable flaws and motives rather than coming across as ‘just plain evil’ or serving solely as devices through which to parody certain historical stereotypes. The supporting cast, such as Col’s parents, teacher and even the ambiguous dog/cat Murgatrude, also benefit from some further attention. The result makes them much more real and endearing, while still remaining quirky and larger than life.Throughout the course of this novel we finally get a glimpse of what Harland’s world is like beyond the claustrophobic confines of the mobile city. We visit an Imperial colony, located in Botany Bay and powered by convict labour, that exists purely to refuel the roaming juggernauts, and we even get to see some of the other, deadlier, mobile fortresses firsthand. The world outside is alien and threatening to Filthies and Swanks alike, yet can no longer be ignored if they are to continue to survive. All in all, this enhanced worldbuilding adds to the authenticity of the novel, reinforcing the perception of the Liberator as both a world contained within itself and yet still a part of a greater whole.Life after revolutionHarland also does a good job of showing that life is not all joy and harmony in the aftermath of a revolution (complete with ample thinly veiled allusions to the Russian Revolution). Fanatics from both sides, Imperialist and Revolutionary, are depicted as inclined to bigotry and capable of using ruthless means to achieve their goals. Questions raised by the previous book, such as the inevitable reactions of the other Imperial juggernauts to the Filthy upheaval and the plight of their own analogous lower classes, are likewise explored.The novel also provides some exhilarating battle scenes, laugh out loud moments (I’m thinking of Col’s mother’s personal revelation) and food for thought, all set in the bizarre and strangely alluring environment of the industrial behemoth.Why should you read this book?Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed both Liberator and Worldshaker, and while their slightly unconventional style may not be to everyone’s taste, I found it a welcome break from the bleaker outlook and somewhat heavier tone prominent in many contemporary sci-fi and fantasy offerings. While the book is aimed at the young adult audience, I would also recommend it to older readers, such as myself, who are looking for a fun and quirky science fiction/fantasy read that has depth but doesn’t take itself too seriously.My website also has a poll on all the currently availiable covers if anyone is interested. Original version:http://vilutheril.wordpress.com/2011/...

  • Maria
    2018-10-04 04:32

    Liberator picks up in the months after the first book in the series, Worldshaker, ends. The ‘filthies,’ the (for all intents and purposes) serf class that operates the mammoth ship has taken over, and the politics of their endeavor are immediately snarled. They’ve renamed their ship the Liberator, but their former rulers are living in ghettos on the ship, even though they helped in the revolt and encouraged the uprising. The action is certainly tenser than in Worldshaker, and the story begins with a murder that threatens everything Col and Riff have worked to establish. This murder allows for a power struggle that leaves Col adrift, and Riff in a precarious position within the new council. Personal relationships also suffer, as Col finds himself increasingly cut off from Riff as they both try to navigate a new reality and peace for the citizens of the ship. The first time I read Worldshaker I liked it, but was a little underwhelmed by what I thought was too simple a story, and Liberator also suffers from this to a smaller degree. This series is rated for 10-13 year-olds, and the vocabulary and chapter length of these books has been modified to accommodate this young audience. As a result, Col seems a little too naïve, and in places both texts feel ideologically heavy handed to me. By the time I read Harland’s Worldshaker I had already read Scott Westerfeld’s Leviathan (a work of YA literature that has been very well received by adults) and Cherie Priest’s Boneshaker (an adult work that could easily be read by teens), and I felt that Worldshaker suffered in comparison. I will argue that Liberator is also somewhat lacking the maturity level of other YA authors in this genre; I think adults will enjoy this book if they understand the concerns I have pointed out and read the text with a little patience. Steampunk literature is well-known for exploring concerns about class, the mass-produced and non-unique nature of modern technology, and the environment, and Richard Harland’s book wastes no time establishing itself within the genre in an approachable manner that should be enjoyable for both children and adults. In a lot of ways, I enjoyed Liberator far more than Worldshaker because the world Richard Harland has created is much bigger, and the reader gets so see the other imperial vessels for the first time and to understand that the behavior demonstrated in the first book of the series is not unique to these massive ships. The young leaders of the Liberator are presented with a fairly large mystery, and although I knew the identity of the saboteur long before they did, it does demonstrate the precarious nature of a democratic society. I like the romance between Col and Riff, but thought it was complicated enough without throwing the distraction of *spoiler* in. This character is used as a simple plot device and then discarded when convenient to the HEA, and it illustrates the simplicity of the overall narrative. My final analysis is that it is a worthy addition to Steampunk literature, and it is good to have books that a wide age-range can read and discuss. There are many large important themes central to Steampunk literature, and Harland’s books are a great way to expose new/young readers to the genre. Although I have given it three stars, this is a 3.5 star review.

  • Courtney Lake
    2018-10-09 09:01

    I was dissapointed by this sequel, but not as much as I thought I would be so it gets 3 instead of 2. Liberator picks up where most of the distopia literature of today leaves off: After the Revolution has won. And here we see the usual fall-out of a takeover. Hostile retribution against the previous ruling class despite an initial cry of equality, an almost immediate restablishment of a ruling/elite class from within the revolution (Animal Farm anyone?) and the hopeful idealistic views of a few who actually thought things would turn out good are crushed. That said, I liked the way the story moved. From the realization that they were almost out of coal, to figuring out how to get it, and the compications therein. Infighting amonst the Filthies, the attacks on the "swanks". What I really didn't understand was Col and Riffs relationship. We miss a HUGE and important part of it. For a number of weeks (supposidly) they could be together and not be sneaky or ashasmed. they decorated Riffs room, read books and were basically an adorable couple. But we never see that, in fact we don't even really hear about it until almost halfway through. Which makes Riffs brusque treatment of Col confusing, and his emotions of betrayal seems odd. So far as the reader can tell, they are simply reversed, but nothing changed. Only when Col finally reveals that they had a brief moment int he sun only to have it riped away does that part make sense. It should have been earlier in the book IMHO. I liked the battle, I thought the reversal of the Menials was plausable to the storyline and I storyline did not feel awkward or forced. I was never sold on Lyes character but I understood her necessity as a device. So all in all, 2.5 stars, rounded to 3. I'll give the third book a go.

  • Tahlia Newland
    2018-10-19 06:58

    This is a good book and well worth a read, but read the sequel, 'Worldshaker' first. In it you'll meet the juggernauts, huge machines on rollers or tracks that travel the world on steampower and use masses of coal. The jugernauts are basically cities on wheels and have a similar social strata as the real Victorian period. The world Richard has created is quite amazing and well thought through. The machinery that runs these juggernauts are well described so that you get a sense of their enormous scale and complexity. The events in Le liberator take place post revolution and the problems now are inner power struggles and relations with the other juggernauts who are still under the old system. These issues are very realistic in terms of what happens in post revolution politics in the real world. I love the names of the characters, and the desciptions of the upperclass characters are beautifully tongue in cheek, giving the book a lightness to balance the darker aspects of the book. There are no plot holes to annoy me and no hanging questions at the end. It's a well crafted book.As for the first in the series, the writing style is very straight forward with little internalisation of emotions, so I always feel as if I'm on the outside of the characters, the only downfall of this book for me. However, this style, along with Le Liberator's focus on huge machines and crazy steampunk war machines, makes it very suitable for boys. It's quite a young Young Adult book, I'd place it in the 10 to 14 year old category for girls and up to 16 for boys. I definitely recommend it for boys in that age group.

  • Pamela Todd
    2018-09-24 03:54

    As soon as I finished Worldshaker, I was more than eager to get my hands on Liberator. The story picks up three months after the revolution and the Filthies took control over the renamed juggernaut. Though they accomplished their goal, things for Riff and Col isn’t what they hoped. Tension is rife on the Liberator, with Filthies distrusting of the remaining ‘Swanks’, extremist Filthies pushing for more power and someone intent to bring the whole moving mountain to its knees. The action is tenser than in Worldshaker, with things kicking off right from the beginning. Col can feel the distance between himself and Riff growing, and sensing the mounting unease on the juggernaut. As a previously unknown Filthy moves into the Revolution Council, and whispers in Riff’s eager, Col can’t help but realise the Filthies are being manipulated into making an already shaky situation into a full blown dictatorship – they very thing they wanted to oppose in the first place.In a lot of ways, I enjoyed Liberator far more than Worldshaker. The action was vivid, but with plenty of breathing time. The romance was bittersweet and tender, the mystery so thick and well, mysterious, it played on my mind with every page turn. Old characters make a reappearance and the rollercoaster of a ride this book puts you through makes it impossible to put down. This is sure to be a hit with any YA lover, steampunk lover or warfare lover. There is something for everyone in this read that will satisfy all tastes.

  • Adam Alexander
    2018-10-18 07:36

    This was a fun read set in a steam punk alternate history where the action is set on juggernauts, city-sized ships that seem to be all that is left of 19th Century European civilization. "Liberator" is the juggernaut containing the remains of the British Empire. In this alternative timeline, she has undergone a Red October type revolution that has put the underclass in charge. Anti-revolutionary juggernauts are out to get her and the Liberator herself is riddled with class tensions and post-revolutionary turmoil. It is a sequel to "Worldshaker," which I haven't read but the book stands squarely on its own two feet. The main characters are well developed and believable. If I have a criticism it is this: the author sets up two really difficult and compelling crises: one involving relationships inside the juggernaut, the other a confrontation with the "Liberator"'s external enemies. Both, however, are resolved too easily and in ways I found less than plausible. Nonetheless, an enjoyable book from beginning to end.I suppose the acid test is this: would I go back and read the first book? Probably, but not right away.

  • Jeff Hardy
    2018-10-12 06:33

    When i was reading i noticed that this book was different then other future civilization books. Also as the book went on i realized the characters development was very well thought out. i also liked to place myself in the book and if i had been filthie i would have done what they had and taken over the ship so that i could go around and save other filthies on other ships. I think that as the writer was writing this book he wanted to write a future society book that was different then any other one. I did wonder if the writer was going to create a third book or an alternate series. After i finished reading the book i had a few questions i wanted answered. One of my questions was if the writer used other future society stories to inspire this series? As the author was writing this story i think he had in mind that readers wanted a good book about a future civilization. He also had an idea to show people that the struggle in having to be in the best class can destroy a society. the authors intended audience for this book was readers of the previous book world shaker and also readers who like to read about futuristic societies. In all it may seem that this series is over but i feel like it could continue by telling about more adventures of the characters.

  • Angela
    2018-10-04 10:00

    [Obviously this review contains spoilers for Worldshaker so, um, go read that one first.]Worldshaker has been liberated, and the Filthies have renamed the juggernaut to Liberator. Col expects great and wonderful things from the union of upper and lower classes, but the new world isn't as perfect as he'd hoped. Instead of cohabitation, the Filthies are taking over. They're persecuting the "swanks," as the upper-class is now called, just as the swanks persecuted them. And then other juggernauts learn of the liberation. And they're not happy.We see a lot more controversy and issues between the social classes here. In the first book, it was easy to pawn off the Filthies as inhuman; we knew nothing about them. And now, it's equally easy to pawn off the Swanks as stuffy know-it-alls who oppress the lower class. Will they ever see eye to eye? Will they ever accept each other? And after all that hard work, why is Riff suddenly avoiding Col?Every character is memorable; even the nameless Swanks are learning what it's like to be free. But freedom comes at a price—for both classes.

  • Ty Durbin
    2018-10-15 04:39

    If you want to read a book with steampunk aspects and action, the book Liberator by Richard Harlan is the book for you. This book show that if want something you can achieve it with a lot of help from others and when you fully believe in yourself.The plot of the Liberator starts after the liberation of the "Worldshaker" ,the filthies have taken over and they face the challenger of a saboteur causing havoc and making everyone frantic while the other juggernauts are coming to attack. The main protagonists are Col and Riff. The main antagonist is Lye. The setting during most of the book is the Liberator.I would definitely recommend this book to someone else. Someone else should read this book if they like steampunk and the 1850's. Another reason is that it is very fast paced and a somewhat easy read. But definitely you would need to read the "Worldshaker" first. My age recommendation would be +12 due to the history.

  • Kenna
    2018-10-13 08:38

    3.5 stars for Liberator I do feel bad about how unimpressive and dull this review is. It's been a couple long months since I read it and I was never very taken with it in the first place. Maybe I'll get better at following this system. Who knows?.5/1 star for plotPolitical destabilization isn't my favorite thing, but it was pretty well-handled and it deserved its ending.1/1 star for writingTypical YA-heavy-handedness, but colorful and engaging. No cringe-worthy lines and no contradictions so far as I remember..5/1 star for charactersGood characterization, but nothing spectacular. Everyone's a bit manufactured, if not bland. I can barely remember their names, but I do remember their actions.1.5/2 stars for personal enjoymentWhile it's not nearly on my list of favorites, I read it in a day, and it's probably the best steampunk novel I've read yet.

  • Anne
    2018-10-01 07:35

    Col, a Swank, was the future leader of the juggernaut Worldshaker when it was taken over by Riff and the Filthies, who worked in the Below of the ship keeping the engines and boilers running. Col and Riff are now working together to unify the Swanks and the Filthies, however a fanatical element within the Filthies is determined to eliminate the Swanks. In addition, there is a Swank saboteur on the loose who is not helping matters any.Lots of action, adventure, and intrigue. As a sequel, it stands well enough on its own (I had not read the first one). However, the increased background knowledge of the characters from book one would have been useful at times. Give this to your steampunk fans.

  • Indrani
    2018-10-18 10:57

    The sequel to "Worldshaker" picks up a few months after the events of the first book (go read it first, or yes, you'll feel lost). Once again, Mr. Harland keeps the writing tight, and allows his characters to experience pain, grow, discover things about themselves and each other... and kick some butt to boot!I will confess that the "Dune" nod was perhaps a bit too much for me (I won't give details, for fear of spoilers). However, it wasn't nearly enough to ruin the book, and appeared sparingly. I do like that Mr. Harland recognizes that relationships are not always easy, that trust can be difficult to earn, and that prejudices can be difficult to overcome.In short, another great ride!

  • Thoraiya
    2018-10-18 06:32

    You don't have to be a young adult to feel actual physical distress at the opening turns of events on the newly renamed juggernaut Liberator. Richard Harland delivers a (for me) very painful reminder that there are no quick fixes to entrenched inequality, and that being oppressed is not ennobling. Victims can become perpetrators as easily and unthinkingly as anybody else.And I loved following the juggernaut on its adventure to Botany Bay to load coal.With the same short chapters and whirlwind pace of its predecessor, this book would make a great gift for girls and boys who don't read a great deal, or who are fans of John Flanagan or Lian Tanner.

  • Kate Forsyth
    2018-10-14 09:39

    Liberator is the sequel to the fabulous steam-punk adventure, Worldshaker, which I read and enjoyed immensely last year. Richard Harland really knows how to construct a page-turner. The books are set on board a giant metal juggernaut that rolls over the world, carrying an entire city on its back. In Book 1, the juggernaut was driven by down-trodden and maltreated menials called Filthies. With the help of Col, one of the Upper Deck aristocrats, they rise up and seize control of the juggernaut. Liberator tells what happens next, with an intoxicating mix of suspense, humour, romance and action.

  • Trinity
    2018-10-17 08:57

    This brilliant sequel to Worldshaker follows the changed fortunes of Col and Riff as the juggernaut rolls on. Now the Filthies are in charge, and it's the Upper Decks people who are victimised and reduced to a ghetto-like existence.The battle continues as the Filthies take over the juggernaut Worldshaker and rename it Liberator. A world of deception and betrayal ensues as the revolution turns radical. With Col now in the minority with his Swank friends, what will happen to his relationship with Riff, as they both face the reality of a world changing its shape forever?

  • Batsheva
    2018-10-04 05:43

    The class struggle is upon us! The Filthies, the slave underclass of the Juggernaut Worldshaker, overthrew the ship's aristocracy and instituted a Revolutionary council on the renamed "Liberator." All is not well as tyrants arise and manipulate the new government to their own ends. Col & Riff return for a new adventure in this alternate-history tale of 19th century colonialism (and really big machines!)

  • Danny Delacruz
    2018-10-22 04:56

    Great writer. Not only was the story moving constantly but the characters were multidimensional, which I loved. I wanted Riff for myself. I'll admit it. Glad to have picked up this book. It reminded me of the revolutionary war and how the US fought for freedom. Five stars all the way. These pages could of been blank, but they weren't, they were filled with colorful images that made it a quick read.

  • Courtney
    2018-09-26 03:37

    This was definitely better than the first book. I really did like the revolution of Russian Filthies, and the fact that there was a war on throughout the ending of the book. I like the fact that Lye and Shiv were the saboteurs and that it wasn’t really Sephaltina. I was wary before I read it because I hadn’t particularly liked the first book, but Richard Harland proved to squash my doubts.

  • Sheralankmarrott
    2018-09-27 07:50

    This book frustrated me, but in a way that made me keep reading, even though I really was mad at the characters through most of it. I won't say too much to make any spoilers, but characters I trusted from the first book didn't stand up for each other like I thought they should, not until it was too late. In the end though, I did enjoy the book. Again, it could be a bit shorter but has a lot of action.

  • Oni
    2018-10-11 11:01

    If you enjoyed 'Worldshaker', you will probably enjoy 'Liberator' just as much. Unlike most sequels, it remained on par with its predecessor in a similar setting. Riff, again, sometimes proved difficult to like (however, the author did fix her accent in this book...THANKFULLY) and Col was still somewhat uninteresting for a protagonist. However, just like the 1st book, it was fast-paced and engaging the whole way through. Highly recommend reading this. Aus Classification: M (violence)

  • Esther
    2018-10-23 04:33

    It is great to see Col growing into a bigger role and taking initiative in 'Liberator', a nice contrast to Riff taking on a leading role in 'Worldshaker'. Harland handles the relationships, the action and the Filthy-Swank tension so intricately that I would reread this book in a heartbeat. It has a well-written and elaborate plot even with so many rich characters and side missions leading up to the climactic action-packed scenes. Amazing read.

  • Katharine (Ventureadlaxre)
    2018-10-17 06:38

    Katharine is a judge for the Sara Douglass 'Book Series' Award. This entry is the personal opinion of Katharine herself, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of any judging panel, the judging coordinator or the Aurealis Awards management team. I won't be recording my thoughts (if I choose to) here until after the AA are over.